Some Maryland health insurance plans will increase, others will decrease for 2022

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The state’s dominant insurer, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, plans to increase some plan rates by about 8%, but other insurers are looking to continue lowering their rates. Meanwhile, the ACLU has asked a judge to block the ban on treatment of transgender youth in Arkansas.

The Baltimore Sun: Some Maryland insurers look to raise rates for 2022

Maryland’s dominant health insurer, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, plans to increase the rates for some plans by about 8% for people who buy their own coverage next year, a potential effect of the coronavirus pandemic. Other consumers may see price drops as some insurers have said they may continue to cut premiums as they have largely done over the past three years. (Cohn, 6/15)

AP: ACLU calls on judge to block ban on treatment of Arkansas trans youth

The American Civil Liberties Union on Tuesday called on a federal judge to prevent Arkansas from enforcing its ban on gender-confirming treatment for transgender youth while a lawsuit challenging the ban continues. The ACLU has requested a preliminary injunction against the new law, which is due to go into effect on July 28. It will prohibit doctors from providing sex-confirming hormone therapy, puberty blockers or surgery to anyone under the age of 18, or referring them to other providers. for the treatment. (DeMillo, 6/15)

NBC News: Ohio Senate budget includes provision to restrict abortions

Ohio medical professionals would be allowed to refuse to perform abortions if it is against their religious beliefs, according to a subtle last-minute amendment hidden in the $ 75 billion budget passed by the state Senate . The measure, which was added to the spending bill, is being hailed by anti-abortion groups who say it would allow doctors to meet their moral standards. (Hampton, 6/15)

Also –

Detroit Free Press: Michigan wants to regulate “diet weeds” with marijuana

A new alternative to the spread of marijuana across the United States is still unregulated in Michigan, but a state official wants to change that. State Representative Yousef Rabhi, D-Ann Arbor, introduced a bill that would incorporate this new type of weed into the state’s definition of marijuana, making it a popular new product that does not will only be sold at reputable dispensaries near you. to those 18 years of age or older. “We have worked a lot on this bill with various sectors of the cannabis community, as well as with the cannabis seller community, and even alongside the hemp community,” Rabhi said. “We got a lot of approval from these entities.” (Fogel, 6/16)

Philadelphia investigator: As pandemic eases, Philadelphia employers increase mental health resources as they bring workers back to office

During the pandemic, Mark Switaj has been attentive to the way he talks about mental health with his employees. Switaj, CEO of a transportation and medical technology company called Roundtrip, openly shared the times he had trouble sleeping or “was not in the right frame of mind” in meetings across the country. the company. He knew that as a leader, discussions about de-stigmatizing mental health in the workplace started at the top. Roundtrip, with offices in Philadelphia and Richmond, Virginia, provides staff with mental health resources through Fringe, a system where workers can spend points for lifestyle benefits such as child care or streaming subscriptions. After Switaj noticed that no one had taken time off during the pandemic, he implemented half-day Fridays every two weeks. And the company is slowly bringing its 45 or so employees back to the offices, with lots of feedback from the teams. (Ao and Hetrick, 6/15)

North Carolina Health News: Proposed law could improve the lives of North Carolina foster parents

In 2016, Brooks Rainey Pearson and her husband decided to become foster parents. They did not have children, but they wanted to provide a welcoming home for children whose family life was unstable. The couple took the required courses from County Durham and completed the hours of training needed to become foster parents. (Dougani, 6/16)

This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of coverage of health policies by major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.

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